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Share sims by balloon

Share sims by balloon

I've thought of a novel way to spread Giffgaff... When GG send you out new sims to share they can also send some Giffagff balloons. You pop the sim card into an envelope and attach it to the balloon (once you've filled it with helium). A note in the envelope says something along the lines of,

"This is part of a social experiment. Please register your details on www.giffgaff.com and let us know where you are and how you got this balloon and who the users name is. As thanks for doing this, register the attached sim card and recieve £5 worth of airtime credit!".

And then you release the balloon from your house. We will see how far the balloons got and maybe a prize could be offered to the user who gets the furthest away from home. 

5 Comments
navigator
I don't think the danger to wildlife would offer very good publicity to giffgaff.
seer

Novel idea thinking outside the box like that, but 71% of the world is covered by water and only about 3% of the world is populated, so there's only a 29% chance of it hitting land, and a far smaller chance of someone finding the sim.... then they would have to want to activate it etc etc, so probably the costs would outweigh the return i would suspect

cim
phenomenon

Hi, its a creative idea but sounds very inefficient to me.

 

Also there has also been an ecological backlash against balloon races in recent years due to concerns about marine damage etc.

genius

Who is going to pay the vet bill when a cow decides a balloon and a sim card look tasty?

phenomenon

@cim  

@neilwin

It is as cim says, creative, and cute . . .

  • but I think it would be a waste of SIMs as well as ecologically unsound.
  • Although giffgaff do not charge for their SIMs like some networks do, the cost to make them is not negligible, and
  • they contain expensive metal (even though in very small amounts).
  • The only saving feature is that the phone numbers are not assigned until the SIM is activated, and then it is a randomly generated unique number.

Ecologically, it is both the metal and plastic, and the balloon, which represent a hazard to the natural environment.

 

I think I would have to say, 'no.'

 

Jes