Knowledge Base
Community

Update the list of "non-mobile" prefixes

Update the list of "non-mobile" prefixes

The current version of the "non-mobile numbers" list (dated 26 November 2013) can be found here.

 

It is now over a year old and I suspect that it is at least partly out of date.

 

074060, 074061, 074062, 074063, 074064, 074065, 074066, 074067, 074068, 074069, 074171, 074172, 074176, 074177, 074179, 074181, 074182, 074185, 074186, 074188, 074390, 074391, 074409, 074410, 074411, 074412, 074415, 074417, 074418, 074419, 074515, 074516, 074517, 074572, 074574, 074577, 074578, 074579, 074580, 074581, 074582, 074583, 074584, 074588, 074653, 074655, 075203, 075204, 075205, 075207, 075208, 075209, 075370, 075373, 075375, 075376, 075377, 075590, 075591, 075592, 075593, 075595, 075597, 075598, 075599, 075710, 075718, 075890, 075891, 075892, 075893, 075898, 075899, 077000, 077001, 077442, 077443, 077444, 077445, 077446, 077447, 077448, 077449, 077530, 077552, 077553, 077554, 077555, 078220, 078221, 078222, 078224, 078225, 078226, 078227, 078229, 078644, 078722, 078727, 078730, 078744, 078745, 078922, 078925, 078930, 078931, 078933, 078938, 078939, 079110, 079112, 079118, 079245, 079780, 079781, 079782, 079783, 079784, 079785, 079786, 079787, 079789.

 

 

Please investigate whether the above list is up to date. I found a slightly longer list (with 5 extra entries) elsewhere:

 

074060, 074061, 074062, 074063, 074064, 074065, 074066, 074067, 074068, 074069, 074171, 074172, 074176, 074177, 074179, 074181, 074182, 074185, 074186, 074188, 074390, 074391, 074409, 074410, 074411, 074412, 074414, 074415, 074417, 074418, 074419, 074515, 074516, 074517, 074572, 074574, 074577, 074578, 074579, 074580, 074581, 074582, 074583, 074584, 074588, 074653, 074655, 075200, 075201, 075203, 075204, 075205, 075207, 075208, 075209, 075370, 075373, 075375, 075376, 075377, 075378, 075379, 075590, 075591, 075592, 075593, 075595, 075597, 075598, 075599, 075710, 075718, 075890, 075891, 075892, 075893, 075898, 075899, 077000, 077001, 077442, 077443, 077444, 077445, 077446, 077447, 077448, 077449, 077530, 077552, 077553, 077554, 077555, 078220, 078221, 078222, 078224, 078225, 078226, 078227, 078229, 078644, 078722, 078727, 078730, 078744, 078745, 078922, 078925, 078930, 078931, 078933, 078938, 078939, 079110, 079112, 079118, 079245, 079780, 079781, 079782, 079783, 079784, 079785, 079786, 079787, 079789.

 

 

While calls to these numbers are known to cost 20p per minute, there is some confusion surrounding the cost of text messages sent to these numbers. Please clarify whether this is 20p (as stated on the price list page) or 8p as mentioned in various forum threads.

 

For clarity, please also arrange the list of prefixes into a three column layout like that used in the premium rate numbers price list.

 

Finally, amend the version number to "1.2" and update the publication date.

 

 

Idea Issue Tracker

 

 

14 Comments
aspirant
What's this all about lost me
heavy hitter

@paolo111

They may look like mobile numbers which are included in your goodbag (if you have one),

but these are special numbers and are not included, so are charged at 20p/minute out of your air-time credit.

 

@ian011  good to see someone is watching our backs Smiley Wink

 

Supported but something like this shouldn't have to go through the ideas process to get sorted.

enigma
Needs constantly updating
I ate the FAQ

Well done on persisting with changes required Ian.  Like blackfive460 has said I'm not keen that giffgaff have forced these ongoing maintenence issues onto the ideas board but of course I want all the necessary changes done. Smiley Happy

 

So my own personal strictness on kudosing only proper and non duplicate ideas stands but I will certainly add my support to wanting the proper changes made. Smiley Happy

navigator
Would it be possible to have a warning if you tried to phone a number that isn't included in a goody bag
6_9
contributor
I support this; why do these numbers even exist? To con us people?!
augur

@you wrote:
Why do these numbers even exist?

Whenever you make a call, giffgaff has to pay a termination fee to the other telecoms provider to pay for the onwards delivery of your call to the intended recipient.

 

The termination rates for calls to standard landlines and mobiles is, nowadays, small - but that has not always been the case. The termination rate for calls to landlines is currently much less than half a penny per minute and has been very low for a number of years. This allows landline and mobile operators to offer unlimited calls to landlines for a relatively small monthly fee.

 

When mobile phones were first invented, the termination rate for calls to mobile phones was 30p per minute or more. While this meant mobile operators had to pay each other a lot of money when cross-network calls were made, the vast majority of incoming calls were coming from landlines. This revenue stream helped to pay towards the massive costs incurred by mobile providers in building their networks - which cost hundreds of millions of pounds to set up.

 

Over the next couple of decades, the mobile termination rate has steadily reduced, but not fast enough for the regulators. Ofcom intervened in the market several years ago and forced an annual stepped reduction down to less than a penny per minute. This has allowed a massive increase in the number of inclusive minutes in call bundles and in contract deals on mobile phones for calls to mobile phones.

 

Landline operators haven't yet offered cheap calls to mobile phones. However, with further annual reductions in the mobile termination rate in the pipeline, we are not that far away from landline providers being able to offer unlimited calls to mobile phones in their monthly deals.

 

In the early days of mobile phones, back when mobile termination rates were very high, Ofcom allowed some non-mobile services to use 07 mobile numbers. These had similarly high termination rates and these were equally expensive to call. Crucially, these services have not been subject to the same termination rate reductions so these calls have remained expensive and do not count towards inclusive allowances.

 

Although Jersey, Guernsey and Isle of Man all share the same UK national number plan, they have their own governments, their own charging structure and their own termination rates. Additionally, they allow various providers to supply so-called international SIMs to people who are not resident and will be using the SIM elsewhere.

 

The high termination rates still in effect for these numbers prevents mainland operators offering the same deals for these calls as they do for calls to standard mainland mobile numbers. However, if a mainland operator were to buy out the island operators, termination rates and call prices might be unified, but a buyout is unlikely to happen.

 

A similar problem with termination rates affects calls to 070 personal numbers. These were introduced with high termination rates which fund the various services. These have not reduced and are now another expensive exception in a sea of cheap calls.

 

Ofcom currently has its hands full with the impending introduction of Clear Call Rates for Everyone on 26 June 2015 covering calls to 084, 087, 090, 091, 098, 118 numbers. This sees the call cost split into separate parts, an Access Charge retained by giffgaff and a Service Charge passed on to the service provider, each separately declared.

 

Once Ofcom completes its current programme of work, they intend to tackle 055, 056, 070 and 076 numbering. It is possible these number ranges will eventually be phased out. Ofcom recently made a small start by announcing that all 0500 numbers will be discontinued on 3 June 2017. Existing users have been offered the matching 0808 5 number where the final six digits remain the same.

 

So, there's a long history as to how the various exceptions arose and it will be complicated to clear it all up. It is likely that many of the non-mobile services will relocate to more suitable number ranges, those starting 084, 087 or 09, where they can properly declare their Service Charge.

 

Major change is years away so it is important that accurate information about these exceptions is available.

 

heavy hitter

@ian011 

Thank you Ian for a very informative post.

It's interesting to be reminded of how we got to where we are today.

I remember when the nation (almost) all became "01" and how we were told that it would resolve the "number" issue for years to come. I can't remember exactly now, but I think it was only about two or three years before they realised that they got it wrong and messed up the grand plan by having to introduce "02" numbers. Proving that you need a very powerful telescope to be able to see very far into the future as far as telecoms is concerned.

For sure number allocation is now a complete pigs ear of a mess and it looks like your knowledge of such matters will be in high demand for some time yet.

 

Cheers

Bill.

augur

The changes in the 1990s were necessarily complicated, but the end goal was simplification.

 

Moving London numbers away from 01 in 1990, freed up the whole of 01 for future use.

 

In 1995, landline area codes from 0200 to 0998 were moved to 01200 to 01998, thus freeing up many codes from 02 to 09. The move to 01 was heralded as the last major national move for landline numbers and that has been the case.

 

At that time, mobile, non-geographic and premium prefixes were spread somewhat randomly throughout 02 to 09. The next step was to tidy those up.

 

In 1998, new mobile numbers beginning 077, 078 and 079, new non-geographic numbers starting 084 and 087, and new premium numbers starting 090 started to be issued.

 

A small number of areas were individually running out of landline telephone numbers. Those were addressed by the Big Number Change in 2001, moving some area codes into the 02 range, e.g. London became 020. In 1990, London numbers used the 01 area code and had 7-digit local numbers. By 2001, this had changed to 020 with 8-digit local numbers: ten times the capacity, of which less than a third has been used so far. London is unlikely to run out of landline numbers until well into the 22nd century.

 

Also in 2001, all of the remaining older mobile, non-geographic and premium numbers were moved into the 07, 08 and 09 ranges respectively.

 

There were a small number of anomalies, some of which persist to this day.

 

Once the issues with 055, 056, 070 and 076 numbers have been addressed, this is roughly where we are heading:

 

landline and mobile numbers

  • landline numbers starting 01, 02
  • mobile numbers starting 071075, 077079

non-geographic numbers

  • non-geographic numbers starting 030, 033, 034, 037 (charged same as 01 and 02 numbers)
  • non-geographic freephone numbers starting 080
  • non-geographic service charge numbers starting 084, 087, 090, 091, 098

From June 2015, the call price for 08 and 09 numbers consists of giffgaff's standard Access Charge plus the service provider's Service Charge, each separately declared; the latter varies according to the next six digits after the leading zero.

 

Remaining issues will be mainly to do with the various exceptions:

  • landline numbers in Jersey, Guernsey, Isle of Man
  • landline numbers used by dial-through & automated services ("non-landline" numbers)
  • free calls and text messages to giffgaff mobile numbers
  • mobile numbers in Jersey, Guernsey, Isle of Man (including 07624)
  • mobile numbers used by dial-through and automated services ("non-mobile" numbers)

These are likely to be sorted out over the next few years, leaving us with a fairly simple system. It's a shame that it will have taken two decades to get there.

 

In the meantime, it is important that accurate information about these exceptions is available.