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HTC One X and HTC One S: Reviewed and Compared to Apple iPhone 4S and Samsung Galaxy S II

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HTC One Series.jpgHTC have just launched their new flagship series of Android smartphones in the UK, the “HTC One” series. The HTC One series of smartphones which is currently available in the UK consists of the cutting-edge quad-core device, the HTC One X, and the slightly cheaper dual-core alternative, the HTC One S. Both are high-end devices which were first announced at Mobile World Congress in February and we’ve already posted a video review of the HTC One X yesterday evening.

 

In this article, we take a closer look at both of the HTC One devices and how they compare to each other. We compare them to each other and look at what’s new before comparing the HTC One X to the Apple iPhone 4S and the Samsung Galaxy S II. Finally, we look at how you can use HTC’s new devices on giffgaff.

 

HTC’s “One” Family of Smartphones: HTC One X and HTC One S

 

Both the HTC One X and the HTC One S are being positioned as high-end devices by HTC. The HTC One X focuses on providing high power top-of-the-range specifications such as a quad-core processor and a large 4.7-inch display whereas the HTC One S focuses providing a more compact and fashionable design. To this regard, the HTC One S features a 4.3-inch organic LED display (providing richer colours than the LCD display on the HTC One X) and an aluminium unibody design which is toughened using a micro arc oxidation process.

 

HTC One X Camera.jpgAside from the differences in the design philosophy of the two devices, both devices share many similar characteristics. They both run on the latest version of Google’s operating system, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich meaning you’ll have access to 400,000+ apps from the Google Play application store.

 

Although both devices run Android 4.0, they differ from the stock version of Android found in devices such as the Galaxy Nexus in that they feature the HTC Sense 4.0 user interface. Sense 4.0 offers integration with the Dropbox cloud storage service, Beats audio technology and includes HTC’s ImageSense technology. ImageSense provides several camera enhancements such as “instant capture” of photos, the ability to take multiple photos in rapid succession, HDR photography and slow motion video capture.

 

In terms of deciding between the two devices, the key differences are in the size and form factor of the devices and the on-board processing power. The HTC One S is also approximately £60 cheaper than the HTC One X.

 

 

HTC One X

 HTC One X.jpg

HTC One S

HTC One S.jpg 

Processor

1.5GHz quad-core

1.5GHz dual-core

Display

4.7-inch S-LCD2 display

4.3-inch AMOLED (organic LED)

Screen Resolution

1280x720

960x540

Operating System

Google Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)

Google Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)

Storage

32GB internal memory

16GB internal memory

Camera

8 megapixel with LED flash

8 megapixel with LED flash

Video recording

1080p, 30 frames per second

1080p, 30 frames per second

Battery

1,800mAh

1,650mAh

Text Input

On-screen software keyboard

On-screen software keyboard

Approx. price

Approx. £480 SIM-free

Approx. £420 SIM-free

SIM card size

Micro SIM

Micro SIM

 

HTC One X: Compared to Samsung Galaxy S II & Apple iPhone 4S

 

As HTC’s flagship Android device for 2012, the HTC One X will inevitably be compared to other flagship devices which are currently on the market including Samsung’s Galaxy S II and Apple’s iPhone 4S.

 

In terms of raw specifications, the HTC One X leads the pack with the fastest processor, the largest and highest resolution display, the latest software and the largest battery capacity. The HTC One X’s 1.5GHz quad-core processor should ensure that the device runs super-smooth even when multitasking and the 4.7-inch high definition display should ensure that photos and videos look super-sharp on the display. At 312 pixels per inch (312ppi), the display on the HTC One X almost matches Apple’s iPhone 4S “Retina Display” (326ppi) in terms of pixel density whilst being almost twice as large as the iPhone 4S’ 3.5-inch display. The larger display gives extra room for viewing your content but could also make the device uncomfortably large if you’re used to a smaller phone. Some consumers may also prefer the One S or the Galaxy S II for its organic LED display. Organic LED displays tend to offer richer colours and lower power consumption compared to LCD displays.

 

With the release of the HTC One X, the ball is now firmly in the court of Apple and Samsung. Both the Samsung Galaxy S III and the Apple iPhone 5 are expected to be released in the coming months with both phones needing to come up with something impressive to match HTC’s efforts.

 

 

HTC One X

HTC One X.jpg 

Samsung Galaxy S II

 Samsung Galaxy S 2.jpg

Apple iPhone 4S

 iPhone 4S Siri.jpg

Processor

1.5GHz quad-core

1.2GHz dual-core

1GHz dual-core

Display

4.7-inch S-LCD2 display

4.3-inch AMOLED (organic LED)

3.5-inch TFT display

Screen Resolution

1280x720

800x480

960x640

Operating System

Google Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)

Google Android 2.3 (Gingerbread), upgradable to Android 4.0

Apple iOS 5

Storage

32GB internal memory

16GB internal memory & up to 32GB micro-SD

16GB/32GB/64GB internal memory

Camera

8 megapixel with LED flash

8 megapixel with LED flash

8 megapixel with LED flash

Video recording

1080p, 30 frames per second

1080p, 30 frames per second

1080p, 30 frames per second

Battery

1,800mAh

1,650mAh (8.7 hours talk time)

1,430mAh (8 hours talk time)

Text Input

On-screen software keyboard

On-screen software keyboard

On-screen software keyboard

Approx. price

Approx. £480 SIM-free

Approx. £400 SIM-free

£499 SIM-free

SIM card size

Micro SIM

Standard SIM

Micro SIM

 

All three devices are compatible with giffgaff and some great savings can be had by buying these devices upfront and using one of our giffgaff goodybags.

 

Using the HTC One X or HTC One S on giffgaff

 

Both the HTC One X and the HTC One S require a micro-SIM card rather than a full sized SIM card. Whilst giffgaff does not provide Micro SIM cards directly, it’s really easy to cut your own using this simple Micro SIM cutting guide and video tutorial. If you’re not keen on the idea of cutting up your SIM card, you can also order a Micro SIM from our Microgaff community.

 

In terms of tariffs, unlimited internet is available on your HTC One device from £10/month with one of our giffgaff goodybags. For details on setting up the internet on your new device, please see our guide to configuring your Android device. Finally, if your HTC device is locked, see the unlockapedia for articles on how to unlock HTC smartphones.

 

Your thoughts…

 

In this article, we’ve looked at the HTC One X, the HTC One S and how they both compare to top smartphones such as the Galaxy S II and the iPhone 4S.

 

What are your thoughts on HTC’s new devices and their revamped Sense 4.0 user interface? Will you be buying one of the new devices or are you planning to wait for the announcement of the Galaxy S III and iPhone 5? Is processing power or design more important to you in a smartphone? Drop us a comment below: we’d love to hear from you!

 

Ken Lo writes about mobile technology and the mobile industry at Ken's Tech Tips.

23 Comments
soothsayer

I'm using the One X. Apart from signal issues whereby signal is constantly lower than on other phones and if you hold it at the bottom the signal cuts out almost, and the fact that if you push down on the sides of the screen, it flexes the LCD and deteriorates the pixels, it's a great phone Smiley Tongue

consultant

good review... but apple has already won, micro-sims... does that ring any bells...

associate

good review thanks

maestro

Question I keep asking myself is: Do we really need quad core power phones. I'm an iPhone 4S user myself. It does have a 1GHz dual core, but each core is underclocked to 800Mhz. So in total I get 1.6Ghz of processing power and that's fast enough for me. Then again I think it's how Operating Systems are optimised. Obviously iOS is optimised for the iPhone and Android isn't as is optimised. However in saying that, I guess the Android phones get optimised in some way. 

beginner

useful info, thanks

motivator

ill stick to my 4s cheers.

navigator

I've said it before but HTC are out of the race for me. No changable battery or sd slot makes it a poor phone for me. I have 64GB card in my aging HTC Desire so out of the new offerings it'd be an iPhone which isn't something I'd want. Added with Endomondo and GPS being a battery killer I like having a spare battery when out on the bike. The Huawei Ascend D Quad XL is looking like a good effort, just waiting to see what Samsung have up their sleeve before I commit.

newcomer
im using a HTC Sensation and ill be honest it beats the iphone 4s hands down. i look forward to google's release of their voice assistant dubbed project Majel which will put the only popular feature of the 4s to shame. also the processor specs above are relative. my sensation started with the same 1.2Ghz dual core chip as in the GS2 above but has since been overclocked to 1.8 Ghz and have been running stable on it for weeks now. rumour has it the Htc one x has the same chip as the rumoured htc zeta which will aparently ship with a 2.5 ghz quad core (see the rumour mill on gsm arena). this means there is a possibility that the htc one x can also be overclocke.d to 2.5 ghz i love my sensation though. before the htc one x came out it ranked high on antutu benchtest second only to the asus transformer prime (tablet) with a score of 6749! thats way above the GS2 and even the galaxy note. great thing about the sensation is the expandable memory and removable battery too.
steward

How the hell can you compare the iphone to these 2 badboys...its like comparing a 2CV to a Lamborghini & a Ferrari ?

enigma

In terms of deciding between the two devices, the key differences are in the size and form factor of the devices and the on-board processing power. The HTC One S is also approximately £60 cheaper than the HTC One X.

 

I'd say that even more important than these characteristics is the display - 1280 x 720 vs 960 x 540 is a massive difference. There's also the difference in display technologies; the One X uses Super LCD which uses an RGB arrangement while the One S uses AMOLED and has a Pentile (RGBR) arrangement. For £60, it seems a no-brainer to upgrade to the One X based on the display alone, and the Tegra 3 just seals the deal.