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Not the first time Ericsson responsible for O2 outages, but who is really to blame?

Started by: lordvincent
On: 06/12/2018 | 15:14
Replies: 14
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by: freedmaniac
on: 08/12/2018 | 20:29

@lordvincent

Brexit must be to blame !!! It's responsible for everything else it seems!!

Message 11 of 15
by: various_mm
on: 09/12/2018 | 13:08
@lordvincent


as GG customers, the 'blame' is with GG itself. Giffgaff then blame O2, who in return can blame their supplier

no point getting into who is to blame. focus should be on how GG will compensate it customer for the issue and loss of service .



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Message 12 of 15
by: masterluke
on: 10/12/2018 | 09:47

What I don't get is, once they had fairly quickly figured out it was due to a software update - why did it still take them 20(?) hours in total to roll it back to the previous version and get it back up and running? They both seem incompetent between them.

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Message 13 of 15
by: thunderdragon
on: 10/12/2018 | 23:04
Surely the blame lies with whichever tech forgot the age old fix-all:
Turn it OFF...And then turn it back on again! Smiley Happy

Joking aside though, an expired software cert is a fairly easy thing to forget about on an airgapped machine. I'd suggest Ericsson need to get in the habit of checking the clocks on their dev boxes (Which I think unlikely to be networked on security grounds, so NTP won't work) every so often, as a dev machine with the clock set correctly shouldn't have allowed software to be signed using an expired certificate in the first place! Smiley Surprised Smiley Happy
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Message 14 of 15
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by: techiebloke
on: 11/12/2018 | 19:39

@masterluke wrote:

What I don't get is, once they had fairly quickly figured out it was due to a software update - why did it still take them 20(?) hours in total to roll it back to the previous version and get it back up and running? They both seem incompetent between them.

@masterluke

 

Bearing in mind the number of network devices affected it could be due to a number of things:

 

1. In order to avoid tampering the devices have to check in to obtain the latest update, just like mobiles and other devices that do this the roll out is staggered to ensure that resources such as servers and bandwidth are not overwhelmed.

2. Unless the software is self signed they'd need to obtain the certificate, sign the new package and test it before pushing out (they had more than enough Egg on their face, a duff release is something that they wouldn't want)

3. Assuming there is no auto-update, once the tested package had been supplied to the operator customers, they might have had to get to some sites to install it by plugging directly into the equipment in the cabinet (though I think this is unlikely these days unless it rendered the kit completely unresponsive to remote management by the various network NOCs.

 

 

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Message 15 of 15