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Comments on the Creative Writing Challenge MAY 2019 - KINDLE

Started by: jesi23
On: 07/05/2019 | 22:49
Replies: 25
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by: frenchielove
on: 06/06/2019 | 11:39

Thank you for that info @polowoman we have both had some very unhappy dental experiences and I can quite understand why you would take this stance. So pleased no surgery is necessary, all the best. 🤗💐

Message 21 of 26
by: polowoman
on: 06/06/2019 | 11:49

Thank you so much @frenchielove - as the tooth may never give trouble, especially once it is encased within the gum (should take another month to heal over completely but is well on its way), it seemed silly to go through the extraction ordeal, perhaps for no good purpose. I shall worry about it if and when there is need to do so. However, should have mentioned the dental practice which rang me has specialist dental surgeons to tackle these difficult extractions but as we both know, that is no guarantee they will succeed. Hope you have no more dental problems as they really are among the worst. The 2 abscesses I've had created more pain than I have ever experienced before or since.

Message 22 of 26
by: polowoman
on: 06/06/2019 | 13:58

@123kingarthur - Many congratulations on winning last month's CWC with your childhood recollections. Words do seem to hold a fascination for youngsters and the desire to repeat them has an even bigger magnetic pull! I recall our daughter driving us mad by repeating words over and over again - she'd pick one and use it non-stop for hours, then go on to another. Thankfully, that phase finally faded away! As a teenager she did not go into grunts and monosyllabic words but would had a more eloquent approach and after a disagreement we had on something (I forget what), she flounced out of the room with the words, "And if I didn't bear such a strong resemblance to you, I'd say I was adopted"!! Gone were the days of the solitary word used ad nauseam!

Message 23 of 26
by: jesi23
on: 19/06/2019 | 10:03 edited: 19/06/2019 | 10:11

@polowoman  I’ve just had a filling (a week ago now) under the base of the crown over my ‘seven’ … my dentist is being proactive in keeping my original teeth roots as long as possible: (he put a ‘patch’ on another filling last year, with a plan to replace with a post and crown when I choose to after yet another piece of tooth broke off a tooth heavily filled.)

Click to reveal
It was originally the back anchor for a bridge; when front anchor ‘five’ needed removal, best result was crowning the ‘seven’ as a bridge over a gap of two teeth would be highly unstable … about 20 years ago, so it is doing well … but I had had all four ‘eights’ taken out under general anaesthetic in 1974 (they were impacted, and one was facing the row of teeth). 

I sympathise with your wish to keep from unnecessary surgery!

Click to reveal

@polowomanwrote:

@frenchielove - Thank you for your kind words and advice. I do sympathise with your experience with so many attempts to remove it by different dentists before you were referred to the consultant. I am so glad it went well in the end but it was obviously a really horrendous time for you. I was happy for a hospital referral (had my impacted wisdom teeth out in hospital as I couldn't face the idea of such an extraction in a dentist's chair with a local anaesthetic) but on Tuesday got a call from a dental surgery a few miles from here offering me an appt for today for the extraction, with the chance of a chat to decide if I wanted to go ahead just before the procedure so I'd have to make a split-second decision. It seems the hospital no longer carries out this type of extraction so though I booked the appt did not feel happy with this arrangement. Luckily, I had a check-up booked with my own dentist for yesterday and we had a long discussion on the pros and cons of extraction or keeping the tooth (which is level with the gum, having been crowned) and I've decided not to go ahead with the extraction unless it becomes absolutely necessary. She told me the gum would grow over the remains of the tooth and as I'd already had root canal treatment the risk of infection is low. With the extraction it could mean cutting into the bone, then stitching, which carries an increased risk of infection, as well as the chance that it might still not be possible to remove it so sending me to hospital might have to ensue. The sound of all this being tackled outside of the hospital setting rang alarm bells for me so I have opted to keep the tooth segment in place and if I do get any trouble will get an emergency appt with my own dentist and we'll take it from there. Over the years I've had 8 extractions (not all of them necessary it transpired) and only 2 went smoothly. As you can imagine, I have severe reservations about any complicated procedure based on my dental history. Call me a wimp if you like, but I fear more problems than solutions if I go ahead. I rang and cancelled today's appt and was assured I could be re-referred later if necessary. 

 

Sorry, that was quite a saga - it could almost make a short story for the CWC, if teeth is ever a theme!! Will leave you in peace now, wishing you a good day and look forward to chatting again soon.

Are you suggesting next month’s topic should be TEETH then?

The dentist was pleased the decay under the crown wasn’t as extensive as he had feared, so the filling was effective … hopefully this will prolong the life for another decade at least. I still have a gold inlay which was a student dentist’s ‘examination piece’ in 1975 … just been re-glued once by my dentist … so my healthy eating practices are succeeding!

 

Edited to add: ps … I had to laugh at your daughter’s retort! I think we all have times when it could be a relief to think one was ‘adopted’ … 

 

🤡

 

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Message 24 of 26
by: polowoman
on: 20/06/2019 | 11:06

@jesi23 - Thanks for your lovely messages, though your dental traumas have been far from lovely. However, I am pleased your dentist is doing all possible to keep your teeth - this is the practice today whereas back in the 60s-70s it seemed to be the "in thing" to take out all teeth, as my Mum had. Her friend had the same with a hospital stay as her roots were all intertwined but she regretted it as despite have 3-4 sets of false teeth, she couldn't wear them for long as they made her feel sick. Keep your own teeth for as long as possible is the moral of this true story. 

 

I do sympathise with you as dental procedures are an ordeal and sometimes don't completly solve the problems but I hope you will be able to keep your teeth for many more years. So far, so good with my decision to leave well alone where the final third of tooth is concerned.

 

As to "Teeth" as a topic for next month - it hadn't occured to me but why not, if you think it might make an intersting writing theme. 

 

By the way, are you familiar with the Monty Python sketch featuring Conrad Poohs and his Amazing Dancing Teeth? here's a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lTMiQsMH1g

 

Bye for now and will chat again soon - hope to get back to reading more entries later today.

Message 25 of 26
Highlighted
by: caro120
on: 22/07/2019 | 01:36

@polowomanwrote:

@123kingarthur - Many congratulations on winning last month's CWC with your childhood recollections. Words do seem to hold a fascination for youngsters and the desire to repeat them has an even bigger magnetic pull! I recall our daughter driving us mad by repeating words over and over again - she'd pick one and use it non-stop for hours, then go on to another. Thankfully, that phase finally faded away! As a teenager she did not go into grunts and monosyllabic words but would had a more eloquent approach and after a disagreement we had on something (I forget what), she flounced out of the room with the words, "And if I didn't bear such a strong resemblance to you, I'd say I was adopted"!! Gone were the days of the solitary word used ad nauseam!

Ah that's so sweet.  It's a gift for life having word power!

 

Have heard said that males lag behind on language, something to do with adolescence and the ear canal stays relatively narrow, affecting hearing perception.  They have to catch up once things have settled apparently.

 

It is fascinating hearing nippers practising sounds but can imagine it could get a bit wearing after a while - or maybe parents have the ability to zone out with their own?  I think when tired the ears are the first things to switch off?

Message 26 of 26