Knowledge Base
Community

November Festival in Tokyo.

Started by: tokyobuta
On: 04/12/2018 | 05:07
Replies: 9
Reply

by: tokyobuta
on: 04/12/2018 | 05:07

There's an old tradition in Japan of shops and other businesses buying decorated bamboo rakes to bring them good luck and "rake in the money" for the next year.  They're called kumade (pronounced "kuma-day") which means bear's claw.  Over the years they've become more stylised, and are decorated with all kinds of lucky charms and other things.

They are sold all over Japan, but the most famous place is at O-Tori-Jinja shrine in Asakusa, Tokyo.  It holds two or sometimes three tori-no-ichi festivals in November.  These run for twenty-four hours from midnight to midnight and are bustling with visitors, noisy and exciting.  The narrow lanes behind the shrine are lined with all kinds of stalls and lively makeshift restaurants.  It's most fun at night, and I've been going every year for a quarter of a century.

 

01 iriguchi.jpgThe way in. The white lanterns are advertising Asahi Beer.

 03 jinja.jpgThe front of the shrine is covered by lanterns advertising local businesses, most of them eateries or drinkeries.

04 kumade.jpgA whole bunch of KUMADE. 05 kumadeya.jpgSome of the many stalls selling KUMADE.

 06 kumadeya semai michi.jpgThe twenty-four hour market has many narrow lanes of KUMADE sellers.

 

Message 1 of 10
by: frenchielove
on: 04/12/2018 | 06:49

Thank you for the wonderful photos and interesting info about Japan @tokyobuta

Message 2 of 10
by: themzbiker
on: 04/12/2018 | 08:15
@tokyobuta

Thanks that's really interesting lovely photos
Message 3 of 10
by: tokyobuta
on: 04/12/2018 | 12:49

@tokyobuta wrote:

There's an old tradition in Japan of shops and other businesses buying decorated bamboo rakes to bring them good luck and "rake in the money" for the next year.  They're called kumade (pronounced "kuma-day") which means bear's claw.  Over the years they've become more stylised, and are decorated with all kinds of lucky charms and other things.

They are sold all over Japan, but the most famous place is at O-Tori-Jinja shrine in Asakusa, Tokyo.  It holds two or sometimes three tori-no-ichi festivals in November.  These run for twenty-four hours from midnight to midnight and are bustling with visitors, noisy and exciting.  The narrow lanes behind the shrine are lined with all kinds of stalls and lively makeshift restaurants.  It's most fun at night, and I've been going every year for a quarter of a century.

 

01 iriguchi.jpgThe way in. The white lanterns are advertising Asahi Beer.

 03 jinja.jpgThe front of the shrine is covered by lanterns advertising local businesses, most of them eateries or drinkeries.

04 kumade.jpgA whole bunch of KUMADE. 05 kumadeya.jpgSome of the many stalls selling KUMADE.

 06 kumadeya semai michi.jpgThe twenty-four hour market has many narrow lanes of KUMADE sellers.

 

Bought one this year, too...

07 kumade.jpgWith a bit of luck we'll be raking in the money this year ...

 

 

 

Message 4 of 10
by: dartgirl
on: 04/12/2018 | 12:57
Old Tradition in Japan Very Nice ,You Are Very Lucky , tokyobuta, Am Off To Do The LOTTERY ? good Luck & Enjoy.
Get a free giffgaff Sim
Message 5 of 10
by: thebooky
on: 04/12/2018 | 13:05
These are so nice, thanks for sharing
Message 6 of 10
by: tokyobuta
on: 09/12/2018 | 11:32

A belated thanks for responding @frenchielove @themzbiker @dartgirl @thebooky

Message 7 of 10
by: pamfletch
on: 09/12/2018 | 12:42

@tokyobutaHi please keep the lovely photos coming, it’s interesting to see how other countries look.😉

Get a free giffgaff Sim
Internet &MMS settings | Ask an Agent | If you need a SIM sent 1st class PM Me
Message 8 of 10
by: funnymarv
on: 09/12/2018 | 12:48

So cool and interesting

Message 9 of 10