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Who here wants a hard brexit?

Started by: thelondoner
On: 19/01/2019 | 15:49
Replies: 69
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by: pedromap
on: 20/01/2019 | 23:28
only have one question for everyone
the biggest money spinner for Great Britain is the export of financial services mainly to the EU and before brexit we still have the European passport for financial services which allows us to trade in to the eu without any tariffs

yes i know there is the WTO rules which trump ignores and puts up trade tariffs despite the rules being in place.

knowing all the information above is it still worth the risk?
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Message 51 of 70
by: evr301265
on: 20/01/2019 | 23:33


K89bpa,

https://corporateeurope.org/power-lobbies/2017/11/eu-lobby-register-still-failing-live-transparency-...

This from a committee within the EU,

http://civic-forum.eu/civic-space/european-ombudsman-severly-criticises-the-lack-of-transparency-wit...

This from the European court of justice..

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-court-parliament-transparency-idUSKBN1GY1FG

The constitutional affairs committee within the EU had recommended changes made to information required for lobbying groups within the EU.
And it the EU itself blocking the legislation which prevents secrecy regarding the lobby groups...

https://euobserver.com/opinion/143589

The "GOD" that your swearing to as to which universe your living in,,,

You'd better start swearing harder....!
Message 52 of 70
Highlighted
by: k89bpa
on: 20/01/2019 | 23:58

@evr301265 wrote:


https://corporateeurope.org/power-lobbies/2017/11/eu-lobby-register-still-failing-live-transparency-...

That's about lobbyists, not the EU.

 

@evr301265 wrote:


http://civic-forum.eu/civic-space/european-ombudsman-severly-criticises-the-lack-of-transparency-wit...

That's about the behaviour of national leaders and calls on them to be more transparent, again, not the EU.

 

@evr301265 wrote:


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-court-parliament-transparency-idUSKBN1GY1FG

That's the EU court system confirming right of access, (one may argue that some access was restricted and sure, but ultimately, the system plays out to grant access - the same thing happens on a daily basis in this country with national government, local government and consumer businesses except here the ruling is usually in favour of the establishment/the money, unlike the EU.

 

The last link was an opinion piece not worth commenting on. 

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Message 53 of 70
by: sarahaxon
on: 21/01/2019 | 00:01
Let's have a look at what 'hard Brexit' actually means, because the meaning has changed since the referendum.

During the referendum, there was a more or less standard language to describe Brexit: it could be either “soft” or “hard.” The core of soft Brexit was remaining in the single market, generally referred to as the Norway model. The core of hard Brexit was leaving the single market and seeking a Free Trade Agreement with the European Union, generally denoted as the Canada model.

In the months which followed the result, a political battle took place within the Tory Party and the government over what Brexit should actually mean. Many expected that soft Brexit would emerge as a pragmatic way of delivering on the vote without poleaxing the economy.

Instead, the outcome, formally announced in T May's January 2017 Lancaster House speech, was hard Brexit. We wouldn't just be leaving the single market but multiple EU agencies, few of which had even been mentioned in the campaign.

Since then, however, a shift has occurred. 'No deal' was never mentioned as a possibility during the referendum, apart from as something to be avoided at all costs. As time has gone on it has been rebranded as WTO Brexit and rebadged as hard Brexit. In the process, the government’s stance has therefore been re-positioned as soft Brexit despite the fact that it entails leaving the single market. This was one of the reasons the government lost the vote so badly - T May's deal just wasn't hard enough for the Brexiters, even though it delivered for the most part what she set out in her Lancaster House speech.
Message 54 of 70
by: shabazmoqsud
on: 21/01/2019 | 00:10

No way i want brexit stopped period article 50 needs to revoked and we stay full member of EU.  A hard brext would cause utter chaos.

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Message 55 of 70
by: pedromap
on: 21/01/2019 | 00:32
read those links and with good leadership that could change, still the only thing that worries me is the uncertainty of such outcome.

the only thing that saddens me is the country i love and admire might be heading for a new austerity

just recovered from the previous one, i hope i am wrong and somehow this brexit might not be as bad, but i really do not have a stake in this decision

my link to this country is mostly emotional, if jobs are lost and can't be replaced i dread to think about the future

the only thing i hope business owners can mitigate the negative effects they perceive will come from a no-deal brexit as one pointed out to theresa may if i was handling my bussiness as you are handling brexit i would have been bankrupted already.....
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Message 56 of 70
by: majorincident
on: 21/01/2019 | 08:33

Business owners will do what is best for them and if they are able to move to a more advantageous operations base, will do so.

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars but in ourselves.
Message 57 of 70
by: andyslc
on: 21/01/2019 | 09:39

@evr301265 Have you really thought your post through? (And I’m not arguing for remaining s leaving)

 

1) The EU is actually pretty transparent but you have to actually go and look for the information. It’s as least as transparent, if n9t more so than our own parliament.

 

2) The EU is accountable. The EU Parliament is made up of representatives of each member state (750) of which we had nearly a 10% say in any vote (73 MEPs). All those MEPs were elected by the electorate of their respective member states. Of course if we wanted those MEPs to truly represent us then a) more people should’ve turned out for elections and b) the likes of Farage and many others should have been pressured into actually turning up or taking part.

 

https://www.votewatch.eu/en/term8-activity-statistics.html#/#0/0/2014-07-01/2018-08-01//

 

3) Which really comes from point 2. If you want disregard for people it was there to represent then I refer you back to how little our MEPs, elected by us have done.

 

In effect you are saying tha our own government is more transparent and represents its people better. Yet, when Parliament actually tries to hold the government to account, by Democratic means, people cry foul. If you think this government is transparent then you’ve not been following the news very well. The EU actually provided, imo, a useful check and back stop for our own politicians who, several times since the vote have already tried to over extend their powers, and have sought and still seek to divide and conquer.

 

We are leaving and we need to leave without a deal imo. If only so that we can straighten out our own politics without the more of Brexit/no Brexit hanging over us. I think we all need to stop and really look at where problems originate from for that to happen. Once we Leave it will very quickly become clear that, while it may not be the answer, the EU is not the cause of many of our problems.

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Message 58 of 70
by: thelondoner
on: 21/01/2019 | 10:32

@pedromap wrote:

only have one question for everyone
the biggest money spinner for Great Britain is the export of financial services mainly to the EU and before brexit we still have the European passport for financial services which allows us to trade in to the eu without any tariffs

yes i know there is the WTO rules which trump ignores and puts up trade tariffs despite the rules being in place.

knowing all the information above is it still worth the risk?

Yes it is. Bring on hard Brexit! I want a no deal brexit on WTO rules. The EU have shown themselves to be inflexible bullies. May is merely their puppet. She never really wanted a Brexit and should not be leaving the government. 

 

Does anyone know whether Jeremy Corbyn voted to leave or stay? He comes across as a eurosceptic but many in his party seem to be pushing him towards a pointless second referendum!

Message 59 of 70
by: nefarius
on: 21/01/2019 | 10:35

There won't be a hard Brexit. A no deal most likely. And Corbyn should resign to put Labour back on the map. 

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Message 60 of 70