Knowledge Base
Community

Unauthorised PAY FOR IT debits 14.11.18

Started by: johngiffgaffbrown
On: 14/11/2018 | 15:06
Replies: 10
Reply

Go to best answer
by: johngiffgaffbrown
on: 14/11/2018 | 15:06 edited: 14/11/2018 | 18:19

I have been recieving messages from 033005355848 saying I am a member of "Fitmate TV". As I have not signed up for this or requested this I have ignored the texts.  I now understand that I have been running up a bill of £3/week for the past five weeks.  I have just sent a STOP meaasge to the number.  How can this happen?  I did not want, request or use this service. 

Message 1 of 11
1 BEST ANSWER

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
by: shamrez8
on: 14/11/2018 | 15:10
Hi @johngiffgaffbrown
You need airtime credit to send the STOP message, but in the email or message there ought to be a customer services number which should be able to call.

It is important that you do send the STOP text or that you get them to unsubscribe you. If you don't do so the messages will still be sent, using up any credit you have, and even if you don't have credit the charges will still be applied when you next add air time credit.

Simply blocking the number will not stop the texts or charges as they are charged at network level, blocking simply stops them appearing on your phone but you will still be charged

I suggest you check out this https://community.giffgaff.com/t5/Tips-Guides/Premium-text-charges-do-s-And-don-t-s/td-p/18597940 thread on dos and don't when it comes to Premium text charges.
Get a free giffgaff Sim
Message 2 of 11
Highlighted
by: shamrez8
on: 14/11/2018 | 15:10
Hi @johngiffgaffbrown
You need airtime credit to send the STOP message, but in the email or message there ought to be a customer services number which should be able to call.

It is important that you do send the STOP text or that you get them to unsubscribe you. If you don't do so the messages will still be sent, using up any credit you have, and even if you don't have credit the charges will still be applied when you next add air time credit.

Simply blocking the number will not stop the texts or charges as they are charged at network level, blocking simply stops them appearing on your phone but you will still be charged

I suggest you check out this https://community.giffgaff.com/t5/Tips-Guides/Premium-text-charges-do-s-And-don-t-s/td-p/18597940 thread on dos and don't when it comes to Premium text charges.
Get a free giffgaff Sim
Message 2 of 11
by: jammo740
on: 14/11/2018 | 15:38
You might find this info useful: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/phones/stop-spam-texts/
Helpful? Do everyone a favor - give kudos and best answers! Get £5 of free GiffGaff credit!
Message 3 of 11
by: kate1028
on: 14/11/2018 | 18:10 edited: 14/11/2018 | 18:20

Here's another link @johngiffgaffbrown - specifically regarding Payforit scams:

 

https://payforitsucks.co.uk/giffgaff-payforit-faq/

 

 

 

Message 5 of 11
by: andy69
on: 14/11/2018 | 18:21
Here's an idea to prevent these scams: https://labs.giffgaff.com/idea/16712363/require-2-factor-authentication-to-sign-up-for-payforit-text...
Please do back it and get your giffgaff contacts to back it to get Giffgaff to implement something to protect their customers from the payforit blight.
Get a free giffgaff Sim
Message 6 of 11
by: tazzy19
on: 14/11/2018 | 18:31 edited: 14/11/2018 | 18:33

@johngiffgaffbrown

 

You've been receiving these texts for 5 weeks and finally decided to send the STOP text?

 

 

@andy69

 

These texts all contain the information needed to cancel the subscription, yet they don't appear to be read and acted upon.

I have a feeling that most likely the 2 FA will  be clicked and accepted, simply  because the message doesn't get read and just OK'd to close the 'pop up'

 

Edit, I know my opinion is unpopular, but sometimes these victims need to accept their own responsibility in these cases

 

 

Message 7 of 11
by: andy69
on: 14/11/2018 | 18:38
@tazzy19
I'm of the opposite opinion: people tend to ignore these messages and thus the default would be that people wouldn't be charged rather than the current situation where they are. That's a much better state of affairs.
Get a free giffgaff Sim
Message 8 of 11
by: margaretcoulson
on: 14/11/2018 | 18:42

Hi there @johngiffgaffbrown

 

Sorry to hear that you've received premium rate SMS text messages from FitMate.tv, which has deducted money from your Giffgaff account.  If you have not subscribed to this SMS service/subscription knowingly, it will be an unsolicited premium SMS text scam.  This is an issue that is affecting all mobile network operators, not just giffgaff. 

 

This is important:  Please text the word STOP to the shortcode number on the message (will cost 10p to send the text from airtime credit top-up), hopefully, that should stop future account balance deductions.

 

Please take a look at the Premium Rate text do's and don'ts guide for useful information on what to do if you have been affected https://community.giffgaff.com/t5/Tips-Guides/Premium-text-charges-do-s-And-don-t-s/m-p/18597940/hig....

 

With Ofcom's approval, the Phone-paid Services Authority are the UK regulator for premium rate texts services http://psauthority.org.uk/for-consumers/unexpected-phone-charge. You can make an enquiry online http://psauthority.org.uk/for-consumers/making-an-enquiry and they can look into this charge for you.

 

These "subscription services" can only take money from any airtime credit you have, so, in the meantime it may be an idea to purchase a goodybag bundle instead, at least until you get this sorted.  https://giffgaff.com/sim-only-plans

 

You can also convert your existing airtime credit balance into a goodybag too.  Please click the link below for a full step-by-step guide on how to purchase a goodybag from existing airtime credit.

 

http://community.giffgaff.com/t5/Solve-your-questions/Can-I-buy-a-goodybag-with-my-existing-...

 

Many thanks,

 

Mags Smiley Happy

 

Get a free giffgaff Sim
Message 9 of 11
by: tazzy19
on: 14/11/2018 | 18:44

@andy69

By ignoring these messages currently they're racking up charges, despite being told it will cost them.

What makes you think they wouldn't simply click OK on the 2FA pop up without reading it, and thus be subscribed?

Message 10 of 11