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Call Line Identity Spoofing.

Started by: alicantesteve
On: 10/10/2018 | 09:30
Replies: 11
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by: alicantesteve
on: 10/10/2018 | 09:30


You receive a call from someone claiming to be from your bank. You know it is your bank because their telephone number is showing up on your caller display.....but can you be sure.
There are easily obtainable apps on the market which allow fraudsters to generate a caller ID, so when they call you, they can set any number as their identity. You think it is the bank calling when in reality it is a fraudster and your guard is dropped.
Remember, if you have any doubts about who you are speaking to, terminate the call and call your bank or whoever the caller claims to be from, using another phone. This ensures there is no chance of the telephone line being left open.

Message 1 of 12
by: sheppola
on: 10/10/2018 | 11:22

@alicantesteve

 

Good post/s and it's good to remind people to be on their guard all the time.Also NEVER call back to the number they give you or in a text.Go online and find the Actual number you need e.g NEVER trust your mobile phone to give you the correct info.

 

There have also been a lot of Spam calls recenlty that appear to have UK City prefixes like London/Manchester etc and these can be bogus and have been faked.

 

 

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"The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
Message 2 of 12
by: _kara_
community giff-staffer

on: 13/10/2018 | 14:31 edited: 13/10/2018 | 14:35

This has been on a recent episode of BBCs Rip Off Britain ( https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bml15y <this episode for anyone who wants to watch while it is still up) in an episode with plenty of info on current bank scams. They also suggested checking this site https://haveibeenpwned.com/ which will let you know if your email address is known to be subject to a data breach anywhere. It's always best to be aware of these scams, so thanks to @alicantesteve for that.

giffgaff Educator

Message 3 of 12
by: 15hzp61
on: 12/11/2018 | 11:12
The wind isn’t man made... derr
Message 4 of 12
by: inotch_for_isheep
on: 27/11/2018 | 03:03
Quote by 15hzp61, "The wind isn't man made"

It is when it emanates from the hindquarters.
Message 6 of 12
by: c_lockett
on: 27/11/2018 | 11:17
Good information @alicantesteve. I had no idea that it was possible to do that!
Message 7 of 12
by: alicantesteve
on: 27/11/2018 | 23:05

@c_lockett There’s so many scams going on that it’s hard to keep up at times,certainly keeps you on your toes,especially the continual bombardment via email.

Message 8 of 12
by: sheppola
on: 27/11/2018 | 23:11

@alicantesteve

@alicantesteve wrote:

@c_lockett There’s so many scams going on that it’s hard to keep up at times,certainly keeps you on your toes,especially the continual bombardment via email.

Yep but we are,"On-The-Case" now Smiley Very Happy

:smt026

If this post helped please click the Kudos Button and or,"Best Answer"
"The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
Message 9 of 12
by: c_lockett
on: 28/11/2018 | 09:07

@_kara_ wrote:

This has been on a recent episode of BBCs Rip Off Britain ( https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bml15y <this episode for anyone who wants to watch while it is still up) in an episode with plenty of info on current bank scams. They also suggested checking this site https://haveibeenpwned.com/ which will let you know if your email address is known to be subject to a data breach anywhere. It's always best to be aware of these scams, so thanks to @alicantesteve for that.

My email came up on the  have I been pawned website . But does this mean I should abandon my email account and create another one? I have changed my Passwords on every site I can think of. Thing is I have no idea where my email was pawned. Ive never been notified of a data breach anywhere.

Message 10 of 12